Alongside the multi-million pound schemes, the conservation of railway buildings also includes smaller structures and, to reflect this, the National Railway Heritage Awards has the Supporters Award, supported by the Heritage Railway Association, J. and J. W. Longbottom and Railway Property Regeneration, which seeks to recognise these smaller schemes. The winner of the 2015 competition, announced at the ceremony held at Merchant Taylors’ Hall in London in December 2015, was the restoration of the Laird’s waiting room at Ladybank, in Fife, on the main line between Dundee and Edinburgh. Dating originally to 1847, Ladybank is regarded by Historic Scotland as ‘now the oldest Scottish station surviving substantially unaltered’. The Laird’s waiting room had become effectively derelict and, during 2014 and 2015, the Ladybank Development Trust and the Fife Historic Buildings Trust undertook the restoration of this important structure. On Monday 9 June the plaque awarded at the ceremony in December was formally unveiled by Chris Smyth, of the Heritage Railway Association and a trustee of the National Railway Heritage Awards, and John Ellis, Chairman of the National Railway Heritage Awards.

Ladybank

The official party after the unveiling of the plaque at Ladybank on 18 May, From the left are Andy Savage, Director of the Railway Heritage Trust, Chris Smyth, of the Heritage Railway Association and a Trustee of the National Railway Heritage Awards, Patricia O’Neill, Chair of the Ladybank Development Trust, Colin Whyte, SCRF Fund Manager for ScotRail, Christine May, Chair of the Fife Historic Buildings Trust, John Ellis, Chairman of the National Railway Heritage Awards, and John Cameron, owner of ‘A4’ Pacific No 60009 Union of South Africa. John Yellowlees